Rev Esp Quimioter 2017; October 25

Mechanisms of resistance to daptomycin in Staphylococcus aureus

NATALIA GÓMEZ CASANOVA, MARÍA SILLER RUIZ, JUAN LUIS MUÑOZ BELLIDO

Daptomycin is a cyclic lipopeptide active against multidrug-resistant Gram-positives, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and S. aureus with reduced susceptibility to vancomycin. It is 4-8 fold as active as vancomycin against methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and MRSA, and retains most of this activity against S. aureus with reduced susceptibility to vancomycin.  The mechanism of action of daptomycin is not fully understood. Daptomycin binds to the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane, leading to depolarization due to the loss of potassium ions from the cytoplasm. Daptomycin non-susceptibility is unusual in the clinical setting. Different mechanisms have been proposed to explain daptomycin-resistance, most of them associated to changes in composition, charge and fluidity of the cell wall. The mprF mutations, which lead to an increase in the lysyl-phosphatidyl glycerol production, and rpoB and rpoC mutations (rpo genes encode for bacterial RNA polymerase subunits) have been proposed as associated to daptomycin-resistance, but a number of mutations in other genes ( walK, cls, ggrA…) have been proposed.

Rev Esp Quimioter 2017; October 25 [Full-text PDF]