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Rev Esp Quimioter 2022; July 22

Impact of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia in COVID-19 patients

MARIA ESPINOSA PEREZ, ROSA GARCÍA FENOLL, SARAY MORMENEO BAYO, ROSA MARÍA MARTÍNEZ ÁLVAREZ, VIOLETA FRUTOS MILLÁN, MARÍA CRUZ VILLUENDAS USÓN, MARÍA PILAR PALACIÁN RUIZ, JOSÉ MIGUEL ARBONÉS MAINAR, MARÍA CARMEN MARTÍNEZ JIMÉNEZ, CARLOS RAMOS PAESA

Published: 22 July 2022

http://www.doi.org/10.37201/req/022.2022

Introduction. The disease caused by SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) has been a challenge for healthcare professionals since its appearance. Staphylococcus aureus has been described as one of the main pathogens causing bacterial infections in viral pandemics. However, co- infection with S. aureus causing bacteremia in patients with COVID-19 has yet to be well studied.
Methods. We performed a e study of S. aureus bacteremia (SAB) at Hospital Miguel Servet (Zaragoza) from March 2020 to February 2021. The clinical characteristics, mortality and risk factors of adults hospitalized patients with BSA associated COVID-19 compared to patients without COVID-19.
Results. A total of 95 patients with SAB were identified. 27.3% were positive for SARS-CoV-2. SAB represented 9.9% of bacteremia, being the second agent in frequency after E. coli. Nosocomial bacteremia was more frequent in the group of COVID-19 patients. The most frequent source of BSA in these patients was the respiratory source (26.9% vs 0%; P<0.001) followed by the skin (15.5% vs 15.9%; P=1). The development of sepsis was more frequent in COVID-19 patients (61,5% vs 7,8%; P=0,336) and among them, who received dexamethasone at doses > 6 mg/day (62.5% vs. 37.5%, P<0.05).
Conclusions. Our data suggest that BSA has a negative impact on the evolution of patients with COVID-19. However, further and preferably prospective studies are required to obtain solid data on the impact of BSA on coronavirus patients.

Rev Esp Quimioter 2022; July  22 [Texto completo PDF]